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Report on Jet engine
Post: #1

Jet engine

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A jet engine is a reaction engine that discharges a fast moving jet which generates thrust by jet propulsion in accordance with Newton's laws of motion. This broad definition of jet engines includes turbojets, turbofans, rockets, ramjets, and pulse jets. In general, most jet engines are internal combustion engines[1] but non-combusting forms also exist.
In common parlance, the term jet engine loosely refers to an internal combustion airbreathing jet engine (a duct engine). These typically consist of an engine with a rotary (rotating) air compressor powered by a turbine ("Brayton cycle"), with the leftover power providing thrust via a propelling nozzle. These types of jet engines are primarily used by jet aircraft for long distance travel. Early jet aircraft used turbojet engines which were relatively inefficient for subsonic flight. Modern subsonic jet aircraft usually use high-bypass turbofan engines which offer high speed with fuel efficiency comparable (over long distances) to piston and propeller aeroengines.[2]

Turboprop engine

Turboprop engines are jet engine derivatives, still gas turbines, that extract work from the hot-exhaust jet to turn a rotating shaft, which is then used to produce thrust by some other means. While not strictly jet engines in that they rely on an auxiliary mechanism to produce thrust, turboprops are very similar to other turbine-based jet engines, and are often described as such.
In turboprop engines, a portion of the engines' thrust is produced by spinning a propeller, rather than relying solely on high-speed jet exhaust. As their jet thrust is augmented by a propeller, turboprops are occasionally referred to as a type of hybrid jet engine. While many turboprops generate the majority of their thrust with the propeller, the hot-jet exhaust is an important design point, and maximum thrust is obtained by matching thrust contributions of the propeller to the hot jet.[14] Turboprops generally have better performance than turbojets or turbofans at low speeds where propeller efficiency is high, but become increasingly noisy and inefficient at high speeds.[15]

Ram powered

Ram powered jet engines are airbreathing engines similar to gas turbine engines and they both follow the Brayton cycle. Gas turbine and ram powered engines differ, however, in how they compress the incoming airflow. Whereas gas turbine engines use axial or centrifugal compressors to compress incoming air, ram engines rely only on air compressed through the inlet or diffuser.[17] Ram powered engines are considered the most simple type of air breathing jet engine because they can contain no moving parts.[18]
Post: #2
A jet engine is a jet engine that delivers a rapid jet that generates thrust by jet propulsion. This broad definition includes air jet engines (turbojets, turbojets, jet jets, and jet jets) and non-breathing air jet engines (such as rocket engines). In general, jet engines are combustion engines.

In common parlance, the term "jet engine" refers to an internal combustion air jet engine. These typically feature a rotary air compressor driven by a turbine, with the surplus energy providing the thrust via a propellant nozzle - this process is known as Brayton thermodynamic cycle. Jet airplanes use these engines for long distance travel. Early jet aircraft used turbojet engines that were relatively ineffective for subsonic flight. Modern subsonic aircraft usually use more complex high-bypass turbofan engines. These engines offer high speed and higher fuel efficiency than piston and propeller propellers over long distances.

The thrust of a typical aircraft engine went from 5,000 pounds (22,000 N) (de Havilland Ghost turbo) in the 1950s to 115,000 pounds (510,000 N) (General Electric GE90 turbofan) in the 1990s, and its reliability passed of 40 in-flight stops per 100,000 hours of engine flight to less than one in the late 1990s. This, combined with a decrease in fuel consumption, allowed for the routine transatlantic flight of twin-engine aircraft at the turn of the century, where before a similar trip would have required multiple fuel stops.

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